We are torn between nostalgia for the familiar and an urge for the foreign and strange. As often as not, we are homesick most for the places we have never known.
When I was a student at Cambridge I remember an anthropology professor holding up a picture of a bone with 28 incisions carved in it. “This is often considered to be man’s first attempt at a calendar” she explained. She paused as we dutifully wrote this down. ‘My question to you is this – what man needs to mark 28 days? I would suggest to you that this is woman’s first attempt at a calendar.’
It was a moment that changed my life. In that second I stopped to question almost everything I had been taught about the past. How often had I overlooked women’s contributions?

colonelhathi:

  • japan ≠ korea ≠ china
  • pakistan is not in the middle east
  • most muslims aren’t arabs
  • geishas are not prostitutes
  • mexico is a very small part of latin america
  • there are 54 countries in africa
  • china has 56 different ethnic groups and none of them eat chop suey
  • singapore is not part of china
  • most singaporeans speak english as their first language, please don’t ask, “why is your English so good”
43 Days left!

Hello everyone!

It has been a very long time. Unfortunately I still do not have consistent internet or computer access…it is complicated. 

Anyway, here is what I have been up to since February:

I headed down to Bangkok and then Ayutthaya and participated in a Thai Traditional Massage Course with 9 other exchange students. We had a blast, it was great to spend time with them, and I passed the exam so now I am officially certified in Thai Traditional Massage!

Next, we headed up north to Chiang Mai for the AFS Midstay camp. It was supposed to take place in February, but because of the political protests, it was postponed until March. As usual, it was a great time. We were all excited to see each other, hang out, and recount our Thai adventures. AFS was great about planning activities as well. We rode elephants and oxen carts, bamboo rafted down a long river, ate a traditional Northern style meal with a dance performance, and of course spent loads of money at the night market and night bazaar.

After that, everyone else headed back to their host families, but the other 3 girls who are on YES Abroad and I headed down to a province called Nakhon Sawan and then to Kampangpet for our community service project. We met the director of the Mae Wong National Park and then we moved into a cabin in the forest itself and proceeded to do service work and embark on adventures. The best part was when we climbed Mount Chon Yen - it was exhausting, but I felt very proud of myself afterwards.

When we finished, I endured the 16 hours of bus travel to get back to my host family in NKP, but I only stuck around for a couple of days. After that, I packed a small bag and took the van to a little town called Loeng Nok Tha, near Yasothon and Ubon Tani. There I met up with 5 of my AFS friends, where we taught at an ERIC English camp at Loeng Nok Tha school. Out of all of the English camps I have taught at in Thailand thus far, this was my favorite one. I really connected with the students and they were eager to learn and have a good time.

Now I am back home, and I don’t have too much planned for my last several weeks here in Thailand. I have a friend doing a week exchange, and my little brother Omsin is currently living in the temple in our town as sort of a Monk student (I’m not exactly sure how to translate it.)

Another cool thing is that a Big C Supercenter opened in NKP - the first one in my province, and it is complete with a KFC and Swensen’s.

I also got some good news - college acceptance, which I am  very thrilled about!

It’s funny. When you leave your home and wander really far, you always think, ‘I want to go home.’ But then you come home, and of course it’s not the same. You can’t live with it, you can’t live away from it. And it seems like from then on there’s always this yearning for some place that doesn’t exist. I felt that. Still do. I’m never completely at home anywhere.

Hi everyone!

I know, I know, I’ve been a faulty blogger. Thank you for sticking by me!

It’s actually harder to keep up with this than I had realized, especially because I’m a perfectionist when it comes to writing things that other people will read.

Anyway, tomorrow is my last day at UTP and then Thursday I begin a new adventure in another town with some friends. Wifi willing, I will post pictures and more frequent updates!

I’ve got about 12 weeks left in Thailand. Crazy, right?

In some ways, it has felt like an eternity. In others, I feel like I just arrived.

united-nations:

“I disowned my family to get a chance to survive and they all died. I was 12,” said Innocente Nyirahabimana, one of the survivors of the Rwanda genocide twenty years ago.
Take a look at these powerful photos of 14 survivors of the genocide, taken by photographer Myriam Abdelaziz.
http://j.mp/1cmm7Yt

united-nations:

“I disowned my family to get a chance to survive and they all died. I was 12,” said Innocente Nyirahabimana, one of the survivors of the Rwanda genocide twenty years ago.

Take a look at these powerful photos of 14 survivors of the genocide, taken by photographer Myriam Abdelaziz.

http://j.mp/1cmm7Yt

united-nations:

13 February is World Radio Day — a day to celebrate radio as a medium that reaches the widest audience worldwide.Yet, there is a gender gap in radio content and management: women reporters & hosts get less airtime than men; and fewer women are in executive positions.Through World Radio Day celebrations around the world, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) is committed to promote gender equality and women’s empowerment.

united-nations:

13 February is World Radio Day — a day to celebrate radio as a medium that reaches the widest audience worldwide.

Yet, there is a gender gap in radio content and management: women reporters & hosts get less airtime than men; and fewer women are in executive positions.

Through World Radio Day celebrations around the world, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) is committed to promote gender equality and women’s empowerment.


upworthy:

It’s Been Over 100 Years Since An Artist Has Done This In America. About Time Someone Did It Again.

More than a century has passed since a photographic journey explored Native Americans with such a broad scope and in this amount of detail. In 1906, photographer Edward S. Curtis was commissioned by J.P. Morgan to capture the “disappearing” race.
In 2014, to change perceptions about Native Americans, photographer Matika Wilbur believes we have to update the kind of imagery we’re looking at when we think of her race. It’s a beautiful — and important — idea.

upworthy:

It’s Been Over 100 Years Since An Artist Has Done This In America. About Time Someone Did It Again.

More than a century has passed since a photographic journey explored Native Americans with such a broad scope and in this amount of detail. In 1906, photographer Edward S. Curtis was commissioned by J.P. Morgan to capture the “disappearing” race.

In 2014, to change perceptions about Native Americans, photographer Matika Wilbur believes we have to update the kind of imagery we’re looking at when we think of her race. It’s a beautiful — and important — idea.